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The North America Nebula by Captain-Marmote The North America Nebula by Captain-Marmote

North America Nebula NGC7000

The North America Nebula is large, covering an area of more than four times the size of the full moon; but its surface brightness is low, so normally it cannot be seen with the unaided eye. Binoculars and telescopes with large fields of view will show it as a foggy patch of light under sufficiently dark skies.

Cygnus's Wall is a term for the "Mexico and Central America part" of the North America Nebula. The Cygnus Wall exhibits the most concentrated star formations in the nebula.

The North America Nebula and the nearby Pelican Nebula, (IC 5070) are in fact parts of the same interstellar cloud of ionized hydrogen. Between the Earth and the nebula complex lies a band of interstellar dust that absorbs the light of stars and nebulae behind it, and thereby determines the shape as we see it. The distance of the nebula complex is not precisely known, nor is the star responsible for ionizing the hydrogen so that it emits light. If the star inducing the ionization is Deneb, as some sources say, the nebula complex would be about 1800 light years distance, and its absolute size would be 100 light years.

A wider view of the whole region can be seen here: captain-marmote.deviantart.com…

Canon 1100D MOD
Canon 70-200 f/2.8L IS II USM
200mm fl
f/3.2
20 x 120 seconds 
 

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:icondanuk86:
danUK86 Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2016   General Artist
incredible :)
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:iconturbulentvortex:
turbulentvortex Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2016
Very nice! The 200mm sure sucks in lots of light at f/3.2!
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks, yes it certainly gobbles up light! Results are pretty good at f/3.2 also, controls coma very well too. I'm not quite sure what is happening bottom left of this image, maybe DSS is smearing it or some field rotation, I'm not sure. Certainly want to revisit the area next summer :) 
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:iconturbulentvortex:
turbulentvortex Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2016
Oh dear...now I feel like getting a 200mm f2.8! =P (Razz)  Well I guess you could check whether the individual subs have the smearing to see if it was a hardware or software issue. Stars look pretty tight at the other corners, though! :)
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
I tell you what, it is a phenomenal lens! Sports, landscape portraits and astro whatever, always performs. 

Having a look through the subs the smearing is apparent on each frame. It is a bit of an oddity though as other images with the same lens are pretty much free from coma at f/3.2 with a APS-C sensor. Even full frame controls coma really well until the extreme corners. Seems good through the focal range too. For example Looks great at 140mm captain-marmote.deviantart.com… I highly recommend getting one :P 

The mount had just come out of 1 year or more of hibernation however and was acting a little weird, couldn't track sidereal rate on its own for a while, couldn't get guided tracking working over 2mins either, unsure why. Probably didn't do a great polar alignment but things are working as they should now.
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:iconturbulentvortex:
turbulentvortex Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2016
Cool! Seems like a really good buy for a widefield setup. What mount were you using, may I ask?
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
It's Turing into my go to lens lately. I have to admit I didn't  buy it with astro in mind,  so it is a happy coincidence. I think I'll get the 1000mm newt going again once the galaxies come round, but I'm finding a good amont of targets for a 200mm fov. 

Mount is an NEQ6,  due for a bit of an overhaul I think! But it works without issue. What  equip are you running?
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:iconturbulentvortex:
turbulentvortex Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2016
I'm running a Tak FS60 on a G11 mount. Although I love the sharpness despite its small aperture, it is a tad slow at f/6.2. Looking at how sharp the Canon lenses are, it seems like a good way of getting the speed in. Living in a wet tropical climate, making use of clear sky time is really important :)
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
Sounds like a really nice setup! I know what you mean about making the most of infrequent clear nights! I've been toying with the idea of getting a WO GT81 with 0.8x reducer, gets it to 381mm f/4.7. I've not really found anything else offering that for the same kind of money, other than newts, but I'm not super interested in them. 
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(1 Reply)
:iconmutschele:
mutschele Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2015
nice , I like
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you :)
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:iconmutschele:
mutschele Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2015
de rien :) :) :)
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:iconphrostie:
phrostie Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2015
Beautiful
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! :D 
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2015  Professional Photographer
Wonderful capture. :winner:
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! Nearly everything is all up and running again, the 1000mm scope is next on the list :D Although I'm really enjoying this widefield work. 
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2015  Professional Photographer
I like wide field astronomy also. :D
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:iconmecengineer:
mecengineer Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2015
so cool
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:iconcaptain-marmote:
Captain-Marmote Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks, thats what I thought when the equipment all worked too! 
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